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Isn't our beloved Catechism, hundreds of Vatican documents and Papal encyclicals, and Sacred Scripture enough?

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" As you can imagine, this answer didn't sit well with my Christian friend, and rightly so. Do we Catholics believe in luck, good, bad, or otherwise, in such a way that it is part of our faith? And, really, I believe we all ought to care how we present ourselves and our living, vibrant faith to the world.

So today I take umbrage with Catholics who bury statues and tell their curious Christian brethren that it is for "good luck." Sadly, too many Catholics today are being catechized by sources such as the secular news, popular magazines, outspoken "conservatives" who must certainly have it "right," and, with greater impact, new age literature thinly veiled as Christianity.

Heterosexual men are more likely to play the field, and heterosexual women must compete for men’s attention.

Of course, tales of scarce men and sexual permissiveness in ancient Sparta won’t convince everyone, so I began to explore the demographics of modern religion.

I wanted to show that god-fearing folks steeped in old-fashioned values are just as susceptible to the effects of shifting sex ratios as cosmopolitan, hookup-happy 20-somethings who frequent Upper East Side wine bars. One of my web searches turned up a study from Trinity College’s American Religious Identification Survey (ARIS) on the demographics of Mormons.

According to the ARIS study, there are now 150 Mormon women for every 100 Mormon men in the state of Utah—a 50 percent oversupply of women.

Dare I ask how many Catholics purchased Oprah's latest recommendation or get their daily dose of faith from Joyce Meyer or Joel Osteen?

I would be afraid to truly discover the answer to these questions.

However, unlike other Christian faiths, we are not limited to those who are with us now, in the flesh and blood, but we also rely on those who have gone before us, the whole of the "Communion of Saints." We also have what are called "Patron Saints." Catholics need only to look to the Catechism (truly an easy-to-read book absolutely filled with every single thing you need to know about our faith) to understand that the communion of saints is that body of Christ that includes the living and the dead; thus, our ability to ask for intercession knows no earthly bounds. Now, what does the Catholic Church specifically teach about such practices as burying a St. Interestingly, because the Church in her wisdom understands her own roots and teachings, and has great confidence in her people, neither agrees nor disagrees with such practices.

Patron Saints would be those faithful elect who are believed to be in God's presence and are given to us as heavenly intercessors for a variety of specific needs. Essentially the Church says, although these are my words and not hers, "When you abide by the practices of our faith and never cross into superstition induced behavior, it could make perfect sense to bury a statue because it isn't the act of burying the statue that you see as having value and benefit but, instead, the intercession of St. These things that move you towards a deeper relationship with God and an understanding of His commands can be good for you. The Church counts on us to understand her teachings and move forward in wisdom and knowledge so that all we do reflects what the Church teaches us about our faith.

As she said, not through conversations with one another that have been influenced by the secular world's presentation of the Catholic faith but by studying Church letters, reading Scripture along with the Catechism, and participating in studies that have been approved by at least one Church organization.

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